The pre-approval process is fairly simple: Contact a mortgage lender, submit your financial and personal information, and wait for a response. Pre-approvals include everything from how much you can afford, to the interest rate you’ll pay on the loan. The lender prints a pre-approval letter for your records, and funds are available as soon as a seller accepts your bid. Though it’s not always that simple, it can be.
Some people don’t know the first thing about getting a mortgage loan. They hear reports of dropping interest rates and lower home prices and hastily decide to jump into home ownership. But the process of getting a home loan differs from getting a car loan or renting an apartment, and applicants who don’t recognize these key differences are often disappointed when a lender denies their mortgage loan application.
There are numerous mortgage delinquency solutions and programs that you and your lender can review. When it comes down to it, the only thing that can stop a foreclosure from occurring will depend upon what you can afford to pay and what your bank will agree to accept. This will be based upon, among other things, your total household income and expenses, what other assets and resources you have available to you, the amount you are behind on your mortgage payments, the type of loan, and other factors. First, you need to understand the foreclosure process. Then explore some of options and resources that can provide you with mortgage help. The final objective of this entire process is to help you stop a foreclosure from occurring. Some of the various steps to take include the following.
Sellers often prefer buyers who come with a pre-approval by a lender. This makes their offer more attractive and can help to avoid any problems that may arise down the line. If  you are looking to get a pre-approval, a mortgage broker or bank loan officers will pull your credit and submit any supporting documentation to their automated underwriting system. This allows the bank to give you more accurate loan terms based on your actual credit score, debt obligations, and income. This will also help you to get ahead […]
The amortization chart below (courtesy of the Federal Reserve) shows how the proportion of your payment that is credited to the principal of your loan increases each year, while the proportion credited to the interest decreases each year. In the later years of your mortgage, more of your payment will be applied to principal, helping you build equity faster.
While some agencies limit their counseling services to homeowners with FHA mortgages, many others offer free help to any homeowner who is having trouble making mortgage payments. Call the local office of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development or the housing authority in your state, city, or county for help in finding a legitimate housing counseling agency nearby. Or consider contacting the Homeownership Preservation Foundation (HPF); 888-995-HOPE. HPF is a nonprofit organization that partners with mortgage companies, local governments, and other organizations to help consumers get loan modifications and prevent foreclosures.
It’s a loan with your house and land used as collateral. If you don’t pay back the loan, the lender will foreclose. That doesn’t mean the bank owns the house until you pay it off. It means they’ve got a lien against the property. A lien is the right to take possession of someone else’s property, in this case your home, until a debt is paid off. So you really are a homeowner even if you have a mortgage. You just own a home with a lien. Zillow’s Mortgage Learning Center offers extensive information about mortgages and is a great resource for anyone in the market for a home loan.

Find information on mortgage assistance and foreclosure prevention programs from various companies, federal government agencies, non-profits, HUD counseling agencies, banks and states. Numerous organizations have pledged to provide loan modification and other forms of mortgage help to millions of Americans. Resources are available that can help prevent or stop foreclosures as well as assist homeowners with paying their current and back mortgage payments.
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