DO THIS: SET UP A QUICK MEETING WITH YOUR LOAN OFFICER TO SEE IF YOU COULD BENEFIT FROM A REFINANCE TO REDUCE YOUR MONTHLY MORTGAGE PAYMENTS. YOU COULD ALSO REFINANCE TO CONSOLIDATE YOUR CREDIT CARD, LOAN, AND OTHER DEBT TO LOWER YOUR INTEREST RATES; TO FINANCE HOME RENOVATIONS OR EXTENSIONS BY USING THE EQUITY ON YOUR EXISTING HOME; OR TO GET A NEW HOME LOAN WITH BETTER FEATURES, LIKE AN OFFSET ACCOUNT OR REDRAW FACILITY.

So one thing that makes a mortgage different from other types of loans is that it is backed up by something – in this case, your home. They call this a “collateralized loan.” Credit cards are also loans, but they aren’t backed up by anything. If you fail to make your credit card payments, the credit card companies can’t take your home away from you.
A deed in lieu of foreclosure is when a homeowner gives the lender back the convey and deeds the home back to the bank or lender that currently holds the mortgage. This has several advantages for both the lender and the borrower, including less of an impact to credit scores, and it releases the homeowner from the debt they owe. Continue with deed in lieu of foreclosure.
Tips for First-time Homebuyers Tips for First-time Homebuyers While buying your first home is a big decision, following these essential first-time homebuyer tips can make the process much easier. Explore these tips for first-time homebuyers Bank of America While buying your first home is a big decision, there are also lots of small decisions to make along the way to homeownership. To help you navigate the process, we've gathered suggestions for avoiding some of the most common mistakes. Know your budget Set a budget. Calculate a monthly home payment that takes into account how much home you can afford, then discuss this amount with your lender. Making sure you can meet your projected future home payment is probably the most important part of successful homeownership. Include PITI (principal, interest, taxes and insurance) in your budget. Mortgage calculators will show you how much you'll pay toward principal and interest every month. Remember that you'll also have to pay property taxes and homeowners insurance. Some financial institutions will require you to contribute these funds monthly along with your principal and interest payment. Be sure to talk to your lender to understand what will be included in your monthly payment. Know how much cash you'll need at closing. When you buy your home, you'll need cash for a down payment (see how much you should put down) and closing costs (estimate your closing costs). The down payment typically varies from 5% to 20% or more. Putting less than 20% down will typically require you to pay for private mortgage insurance (keep reading for more on that). Closing costs could be about 3-7% of the total loan amount and will include charges such as loan origination fees, title insurance and appraisal fees. Budget for private mortgage insurance. For conventional financing, PMI is typically necessary if you don't make at least a 20% down payment when you buy your home. Make sure you know how much this cost will be and factor it into your monthly home payment budget. Research your utilities. If you're moving into a larger home than you're used to, a home that is newer or older than you're used to or located in a climate that's hotter or colder than you're used to, ask your real estate professional to find out what the home's energy bills have typically been. This can help prevent being surprised by a higher utility bill than you're expecting. If you're moving into a new community, find out about water costs, too. Don't forget miscellaneous expenses. Be sure to budget for moving expenses and additional maintenance costs. Newer homes tend to need less maintenance than older ones, but all homes require upkeep. If you're considering a condo or a home with a homeowners association (HOA), remember to include HOA dues in your budget. Keep in mind that you should have an emergency fund on hand to prepare for any unexpected changes in your income (like reduction in your wages) or unexpected expenses (like medical bills). Manage your debt carefully after your home purchase. Sometimes your home will need new appliances, landscaping or maybe even a new roof. Planning for these expenses carefully can help you avoid one of the most common causes of missed mortgage payments: carrying too much debt. It's important not to overextend your credit card and other debts so you stay current on your payments. A smart start Research your mortgage options. As a first-time homebuyer, you're undoubtedly anxious and excited about moving into your new home, but take the time to step back, do the research and learn the differences between the various types of mortgages so you'll know which one is best for you. Know your credit score. As soon as you decide to start looking for a home, check your credit report and credit score with any of the 3 major credit reporting agencies: Experian, TransUnion and Equifax. If you find any mistakes that need to be corrected, addressing these issues early will put you in a better position when it's time to buy a house. (Bank of American credit card customers can get a free FICO® score in Online and Mobile Banking.) Find a responsible lender. When you choose a lender, pick someone you feel good about working with. They should listen to you and put your needs first, and they should be able to explain your home loan options in plain terms. It's a good idea to interview potential lenders to find the one that's best for you. Get prequalified for a mortgage before you start shopping. Knowing how much you can borrow will let you keep your search focused on the homes that are right for you. Getting prequalified (you can prequalify for a Bank of America mortgage online) will provide you with an estimate of how much you can borrow before you start looking at homes. You can also apply for a mortgage with Bank of America's Digital Mortgage Experience Calculate your monthly mortgage payment. You can use our Affordability Calculator to help calculate a monthly mortgage payment that fits into your budget. 2018-07-09 2018-07-09

The Home Affordable Foreclosure Alternatives (HAFA) program is for borrowers who, although eligible for the government Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP), are not able to secure a permanent loan modification or cannot avoid foreclosure. HAFA provides protection and money to eligible borrowers who decide to do a Short Sale or a Deed-in-Lieu of Foreclosure.


The first thing lenders will probably do when you apply for a mortgage loan is to check your credit; you should, too. There’s no better time for regular credit monitoring than when you’re trying to prove your creditworthiness to a lender so you can get the best possible rates. You want to make sure that your credit report is as accurate as possible, your scores are where you want them to be, and no one else is getting access to your credit, possibly harming your scores.
Following the financial crash of 2008 and the subsequent collapse of the housing bubble, many (but not all) real estate markets eventually recovered. Entered into in a prudent way, home ownership remains something you should consider in your long-term financial planning. Understanding how mortgages and their interest rates work is the best way to ensure that you're building that asset in the most financially beneficial way. 
Lenders generally use two different debt ratios to determine how much you can borrow. The short version is that your monthly housing payment (including taxes and insurance) should be no more than 28% of your pre-tax income, and your total debt (including your mortgage payment) should be no more than 36%. The ratio that produces the lower payment is what the lender will use. Many lenders have more generous qualification ratios, but these are traditionally the most common.
Your debt to income, or DTI. Is the amount of monthly debt payments you have compared to your monthly income. Most mortgages will allow a maximum DTI of 41%, ideally you will want a DTI ratio of no higher that 36%. See how much house you can afford using our calculator. Try not to stretch yourself too thin, if you have a high DTI you will be more likely to miss mortgage payments if an emergency comes up.
Where to get the best deal. If you qualify for an FHA, VA or USDA loan, you may be able to get a better deal on interest rates and other costs using their programs. Familiarize yourself with their criteria. Whether you choose a government-backed or conventional loan, keep in mind that fees and interest rates can vary widely by lender, even for the same type of loan, so shop around for the best deal. You can start your search by comparing rates with LendingTree.
Everyone should make sure their credit score is as high as it possibly can be. If you high credit card balances, pay them below 15% of the credit limit. Dispute negative account information with the credit bureaus. Contact your creditors and negotiate a pay for delete. If you have a friend or family member with a credit card in good standing have them add you as an authorized user.
Coming up with a down payment can be the one of the biggest obstacle when buying a home, especially for first-time home buyers. No matter what type of loan you choose, you will likely have to put some amount of money down. Saving up for a down payment can seem like a daunting task, but with the right planning and budgeting you can reach your savings goals faster than you think. Click here for strategies that can help you save for a down payment.
"In August 2006, my husband and I were notified by the mortgage company that our rate was going to adjust. I contacted them about locking in a rate, only to be told that they wouldn't be able to help. Our house payment went up $700/month. We struggled to put gas in our vehicles to get to work and to buy groceries. Then, a friend gave me the number to Iowa Mortgage Help. We are convinced that without the vast knowledge and assistance of Iowa Mortgage Help, we would have lost our home."
Everyone should make sure their credit score is as high as it possibly can be. If you high credit card balances, pay them below 15% of the credit limit. Dispute negative account information with the credit bureaus. Contact your creditors and negotiate a pay for delete. If you have a friend or family member with a credit card in good standing have them add you as an authorized user.
Grants are awarded through a rather competitive application process. The applications themselves are quite complex and failing to answer any question could result in a denial. The good news is that there is literally millions of dollars in grant money made available each year. Many grants are offered only to minorities or to applicants meeting certain qualifications, such as earning a low income. These restrictions reduce the number of applications, meaning that there is less competition for the award. There is also no limit to the number of times an applicant can apply for a grant, which even further increases the odds of receiving the offered funds.
Mortgages and home equity loans are two different types of loans you can take out on your home. A first mortgage is the original loan that you take out to purchase your home. You may choose to take out a second mortgage in order to cover a part of buying your home or refinance to cash out some of the equity of your home. It is important to understand the differences between a mortgage and a home equity loan before you decide which loan you should use. In the past both types of loans had the same tax benefit, however the 2018 tax law no longer allows homeowners to deduct interest paid on HELOCs or home equity loans unless the debt is obtained to build or substantially improve the homeowner's dwelling. Interest on up to $100,000 of debt which substantially improves the dwelling is tax deductible. First mortgages and mortgage refinance loans remain tax deductible up to a limit of $750,000.
Your credit score can make a big difference in how much home you can afford and how much interest you'll end up paying. For example, if you're obtaining a $200,000 mortgage and have a FICO score of 750, you can expect to pay $138,324 in interest over the term of a 30-year mortgage as of this writing. On the other hand, with a score of 650, you can expect to pay almost $35,000 more. MyFICO.com has an excellent calculator that can tell you the cost of your credit score. Before you start the homebuying process, it can be a good idea to check your credit report and FICO score and to do damage control if necessary.
Ellie Kay is a regular expert on national television with ABC NEWS NOW’s Money Matters and Good Money shows. She is also a national radio commentator, a frequent media guest on Fox News, and CNBC, a popular international speaker, and the best-selling author of fourteen books including her newest release, The Sixty Minute Money Workout (Waterbrook, 2010). For money savings links visit Ellie's blog.
Another part of the payment you make goes towards the interest you owe the lender. For example, let’s say you borrow $300,000 for 30 years at 5%. Your payments will be about $1,600 a month. During the first year, almost all of that $1,600 goes towards interest unless you take an interest-only loan (which is not usually a good idea).  Let’s see why you mostly pay the interest during the first years of your mortgage.
When you apply for a mortgage loan in the US, you will typically deal with an underwriter. Most underwriters work for banks, but you can also choose to work with a brokerage. Mortgage brokers don't provide loans directly, but have relationships with a number of lenders. Regardless of the type of underwriter you work with, you will typically be required to:

For the majority of homebuyers, a fixed-rate loan is the best choice, especially in a low-interest environment like we're in now. However, if you don't plan on being in the home you buy for more than a few years, an adjustable-rate mortgage could save you thousands of dollars in interest. For example, if you're buying a home to live in during four years of graduate school, an adjustable-rate mortgage with a five-year initial rate period could be a smart idea.
Military Homeowners Assistance Program (HAP) provides assistance to military service members, recent veterans and their families who are facing housing issues. Banks and national lenders such as Chase and Bank of America are also offering solutions to the nation’s veterans and service members. The military Homeowners Assistance helps veterans and service members.
Since there are so many different types of mortgage loans, it can be difficult to choose the best loan for your needs. If you want a set monthly payment and a definite period of time to pay off the loan, you should look primarily at home mortgage loans. This is a good option if you want to remodel, and you know exactly how much it is going to cost. A home equity loan gives you added flexibility since it is a revolving line of credit. This is a good option if you have several smaller projects you are working on and you are unsure of how much each will cost. It also gives you the opportunity to withdraw the money to cover other expenses like a wedding for your child or to help cover college expenses. Either option does put your home at risk if you default on your payments, even if you are current on your first mortgage. It is important to carefully consider your budget to make sure that you can afford the payments. Once you do this you can be confident in moving forward on either type of loan.

HARP, or the Home Affordable Refinance Program, is the latest federal program designed to help struggling homeowners with their mortgages. Designed to help people who are "underwater" with their mortgages due to lowered home values, it allows people who owe more on their home than it's worth to refinance their mortgages and get lower interest rates. In this sense it is a sort of emergency mortgage assistance program, but it only works for people who don't have any late or delinquent payments. If you are rejected while trying to refinance your home or go through a loan modification program, HARP may benefit. This only applies if your mortgage is owned by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, and you need to owe 125% or less of your home's value in order to qualify.

*Keep Your Home California works directly with California’s Employment Development Department to determine a homeowner’s employment status. If it is determined that a homeowner’s unemployment benefits were terminated because they became fully re-employed at any time during the eighteen (18) month Unemployment Mortgage Assistance benefit period, and the homeowner failed to notify Keep Your Home California as required, Unemployment Mortgage Assistance benefit payments will be terminated immediately.

You borrow money from a mortgage lender to buy a house. You close on the loan and sign a bunch of paperwork. The deed is transferred to you, giving you ownership of the property. You now have a financial agreement with the lender. You’ve agreed to repay your 30-year fixed-rate mortgage loan with regular payments each month. You’ve also agreed to pay interest, which will be included within your monthly payments.


Foreclosure mediation programs have been created by cities, counties, and state governments. A number of local court systems have also created mediation programs that will ensure lenders, banks and homeowners meet with an attorney or professional mediator to explore all solutions to a foreclosure. Learn more on foreclosure mediation programs and whether your state or local government offers one.
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